Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral Palsy Medical Malpractice

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About Cerebral Palsy

Cerebral palsy refers to a group of disorders that affect a person's ability to move and to maintain balance and posture. It is due to a nonprogressive brain abnormality, which means that it does not get worse over time, though the exact symptoms can change over a person's lifetime. 

People with cerebral palsy have damage to the part of the brain that controls muscle tone. Muscle tone is the amount of resistance to movement in a muscle. It is what lets you keep your body in a certain posture or position.

For example, it lets you sit up straight and keep your head up. Changes in muscle tone let you move. For example, to bring your hand to your face, the tone in your biceps muscle at the front of your arm must increase while the tone in the triceps muscle at the back of your arm must decrease. The tone in different muscle groups must be balanced for you to move smoothly. 

There are four main types of cerebral palsy - spastic, athetoid, ataxic, and mixed.

Spastic: People with spastic cerebral palsy have increased muscle tone. Their muscles are stiff. Their movements can be awkward. Seventy to eighty percent of people with cerebral palsy have spasticity.

Athetoid or dyskinetic: People with athetoid cerebral palsy have slow, writhing movements that they cannot control.

Ataxic: People with ataxic cerebral palsy have problems with balance and depth perception. They might be unsteady when they walk. They might have a hard time with quick movements or movements that need a lot of control, like writing. They might have a hard time controlling their hands or arms when they reach for something. People with ataxic cerebral palsy can have increased or decreased muscle tone. Five to ten percent of people with cerebral palsy have ataxia.

Mixed: Some people have more than one type of cerebral palsy. The most common pattern is spasticity plus athetoid movements. The symptoms of cerebral palsy vary from person to person. Symptoms can also change over time. A person with severe cerebral palsy might not be able to walk and might need lifelong care. A person with mild cerebral palsy, on the other hand, might walk a little awkwardly, but might not need any special help.

People with cerebral palsy can have other disabilities as well. Examples of these conditions include seizure disorders, vision impairment, hearing loss, and mental retardation. [Read more about developmental disabilities]  


Batshaw ML. Children with disabilities (4th edition). Baltimore, MD: Paul H. Brookes Publishing Co.; 1997.
Geralis E (Editor). Children with cerebral palsy: a parents' guide. Rockville, MD: Woodbine House; 1991.
National Institute of Neurological Disorders and Stroke.  Cerebral palsy: hope through research. 

Contact the Brain Injury Law Group: 1-800-992-9447

This site is brought to you by the advocates of the Brain Injury Law Group, a community of plaintiff's trial lawyers across the United States united by a common interest in serving the rights of persons with traumatic brain injuries and a common commitment to fully understanding the anatomic, medical and psychological aspects of TBI.

Brain Injury Law Group

Call Attorney Gordon Johnson — 800-992-9447

The Brain Injury Law Group is involved with a network of plaintiff's trial attorneys across the United States united by a common interest in serving the rights of persons with brain damage and neurological damage related disability. We share a common commitment to fully understanding the anatomic, medical and psychological aspects of cerebral palsy and other brain damage and neurological damage related disability. This network of lawyers are not part of a national law firm. We have separate law practices and are licensed to practice only in our home states.

The Brain Injury Law Group is here to listen and for that reason we maintain an 800 number and a staff willing to discuss your case and legal information where appropriate. There is no charge to call. We only represent people on a contingent fee basis and charge a fee only when we recover for the client. For more on Attorney Gordon Johnson, click here.


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